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Summertime Blues!

Summer is here in New England and hopefully all are out and about doing what they like to do when the weather is warm. If anyone complains of heat and humidity I am going to send them right back to February so they remember what cold feels like! I am a sun and fun lover so you won’t hear me complain…no summertime blues for me!

Blue shows up in veterinary medicine in a handful of different ways. We have blue-eyed dogs and Russian Blue cats, blue merle coloring and Blue Amazon parrots. When the eye is blue, that usually refers to

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ACVO Diplomates Giving Back

I am always in awe of how animals enhance and improve our daily life. Whether it is the friendly greeting every day when I come downstairs in the morning or the benefit of the evening walk that I do even if I am not in the mood, to see that unrestrained, unconditional love regardless of the day or mood is priceless. The warm body on a lap during a cold day, the cat rubbing up on your legs awaiting some attention, the look of earnest when you are feeling down, pets of all types fill a very important niche in

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Those darned corneal erosions that won’t heal!

I frequently get asked “what is the most common problem you see?”. The long answer is “depends!” as different species get different diseases, different breeds get different problems, and some problems are seasonal and others are year round. So the allergic conjunctivitis may be absent in winter but cataracts occur at any time and at any age. But one of the problems that shows up on our doorstep on a regular basis is the non-healing corneal erosion in the dog. Your poor friend may be squinting and pawing for weeks in spite of repeated attempts to heal with various

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Losing an eye; it is not a bad as you think…

I was stunned to see the last posted picture on the front page here had snow all over the building and I was talking about our wonderful warm environment that is present year round. Now the warmth of summer is waning and we are all holding on to those last few days with green trees and sunny skies. A beautiful summer was our just reward after such a harsh winter! And September was equally nice!

Our pets have survived as well, and do through many adverse conditions and illnesses that would knock us for a loop. We can learn a lot

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A Warm Environment in the Cold Weather

Been cold enough for you out there? It sure has been for me. I like winter. I enjoy skiing, sledding with the kids, playing frisbee with my dog Tess after a fresh snow, the Winter Olympics this year. a warm fire, Christmas….but wait! I feel like it has been about 9 degrees all season long. Trust me, this is not a big complaint. I lived in Wisconsin for 7 years so this is nothing. And don’t get me started on snow days at school when it closes if it might snow! Alas, that’s one reason we live here is the

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What is the coolest animal you have seen?

This may be one of the more common cocktail party questions that veterinary ophthalmologists get asked! Not that eyes in any species are not cool, but a little exotic flavor can spice up the conversation. Fortunately for us veterinary ophthalmologists, the anatomy of the eye is very similar from species to species. There are significant changes when going from mammal to bird to fish since the anatomy is altered to maximize performance depending on the environment in which an animal lives, however, the main structures are present in most eyes. Disease states will also be different based on these living

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Put Another Lid on It!

Welcome back from the holidays! Hope everyone had a wonderful season full of family joy and giving. Our family here at the Animal Eye Clinic had no complaints as apparently all were on the “nice” list and the New Year rang in sweetly. And now that we have weathered the latest series of storms, I guess it means back to work for all full time!

We had last started a discussion about lid disease. We see lots of patients here with a variety of lid maladies that affect its position, function and appearance. Some are genetic in origin, many are acquired

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Merry Christmas!

From all of us at the Animal Eye Clinic to all of you, may you have a very Merry Christmas, a Happy Hanukkah and a Happy New Year! May your travels be safe and family be healthy and happy. We all hope and pray that the new year will fill us with peace and prosperity after such a trying 2012 especially here in the Northeast. Many thanks to all who visit us here in Wilton as we try our best in our little niche to help you and your furry friends at home stay comfortable and sighted!

Lisamarie, Katie, Christina,

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Put a lid on it!

The eyelid is involved in many diseases that we see and treat on a regular basis. Its function to protect the eye is an important one, whether it be to act as a barrier to prevent direct trauma, to limit bright light irritation or to distribute the tear over the corneal surface. Some species have an extra lid where others have no lids at all! I’ll take a couple of posts to address the lids and we will concentrate on congenital issues here. So take off your lid and stay awhile as we talk about the eyelid and some of

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How do you see what you’re doing?

A common comment veterinarians hear is about how our job is so difficult with a patient that cannot tell us what is wrong. Well, sometimes less is more! Our patients talk to us in different ways with clinical signs and symptoms that help us determine what and where the problem is without the confusion of speculation and interpretation and emotional embellishment of those features that we all do as humans. We use our senses and powers of observation along with listening to the heart and lungs and palpation of the body to get most of the answers in general practice.

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